Historic interurban No. 429 to operate at Headwaters Junction in Fort Wayne

Historic interurban No. 429 to operate at Headwaters Junction in Fort Wayne

Hoosier Heartland Trolley Company and Headwaters Junction, Inc. announced today their intent to operate one of the Company’s historic interurbans, No. 429, as a part of Headwaters Junction’s growing fleet of attractions. The 429 once frequented Fort Wayne in the 1920s and 30s, shuttling passengers throughout the state in the era before the highway system.

How Adaptive Reuse and Hoosier Passion Preserved Railway Heritage

How Adaptive Reuse and Hoosier Passion Preserved Railway Heritage

So, what does a gravel pit office, tire shed, house, an outdoor cabin and a helicopter ride have in common?

-A captivating story full of twists and turns, legendary artifacts from Indiana’s past, and forward-thinking Hoosiers that have worked tirelessly across generations to preserve our world-renowned electric railway heritage.

From the President's Desk: Year One in Review

From the President's Desk: Year One in Review

It’s hard to believe that already one year has gone by since the founding of our organization. As a quick introduction, my name is Austin Mace and I am the current president of the Hoosier Heartland Trolley Company (HHTC). I wanted to take this opportunity to highlight what we’ve accomplished in the past 365 days, where we’re going next and how we got here in the first place. 

Nonprofit announces capital campaign to revive one of Indiana’s world-famous interurban railcars 

Nonprofit announces capital campaign to revive one of Indiana’s world-famous interurban railcars 

As of 4:29 p.m. on 4/29/2019, a group of young preservationists are pleased to announce the Electrify 429 capital campaign.  Electrify 429 is a project of the Hoosier Heartland Trolley Co. to restore Indiana Union Traction Company No. 429 to operation – one of the last remaining interurbans from Indiana’s world-famous electric railroad system of the early 20th century.

Carrying the Torch Forward – Preserving Our Electric Railway Heritage

Carrying the Torch Forward – Preserving Our Electric Railway Heritage

With the interurban system dissolving in 1941 and streetcar systems converting to buses in the 1950s, many alive today do not remember nor even know the state had one of the world’s greatest transportation networks. In the 1920s, the electric railway system peaked with more than 15,000 operating trolleys and more than 2 million passengers in a year. Cars would depart the traction terminal in Indianapolis (trolley station) nearly every minute for destinations across the state, once passing the steps of the Indiana Statehouse. With the conclusion of the Golden Age of railroading in America, began the railway preservation movement.

Bracing for the future – creation of the Indiana Railroad

Bracing for the future – creation of the Indiana Railroad

Before the traditional steam railroads came along, there were two options for transportation: horse or by foot. The advent of railroads made travel between towns convenient for the first time in Indiana’s history. This level of convenience was increased even further by the services of the interurban railroads. The interurbans wouldn’t only stop in town but could pick up additional passengers at almost any crossing.

-This level of convenience, however, came at a cost to the interurbans.

Electrifying Indianapolis’ Streetcar System for the 20th Century

Electrifying Indianapolis’ Streetcar System for the 20th Century

Electricity – the invention that defined the beginning of the 20th century. Indianapolis’ streetcar system adopted the technology in the 1890s – ushering in the new century with it. Beginning in 1864, transportation in Indianapolis was provided by horse or mule-drawn carriages on rails through the street. By 1890, Citizens Street Railroad Company, the dominant streetcar company in the city, was operating 260 cars with some 1100 horses and mules. The inefficiency ultimately proved to be problematic for the City of Indianapolis.

Sparking Innovation – Electrifying Indiana’s First Traffic Light

Sparking Innovation – Electrifying Indiana’s First Traffic Light

Leslie Haines was born in 1883 in rural Hamilton County, Ind. at Carmel, which numbered less than 400 residents at the time. Following his dream, Haines enlisted in 1906 and circumnavigated the globe in Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet, training under Dr. Lee DeForest, a leader in the development of wireless technology. Meanwhile, the Union Traction Company of Indiana had set up shop in Carmel, allowing Carmel residents and storeowners to tap into a valuable new asset: electricity.